GerritHub.io is moving to Gerrit v3.0

It has been a very long journey, from the initial adoption of PolyGerrit at GerritHub to the epic moment where Gerrit historic GWT was dropped with the Gerrit v3.0 last month.

GerritHub.io has always been aligned with the latest and greatest of Gerrit Code Review and thus the moment has come for us to upgrade to v3.0 and drop forever the GWT UI.

PolyGerrit vs. GWT adoption

Screenshot 2019-06-10 at 21.16.48

The PolyGerrit UX was pretty much experimental until the beginning of 2018: the features were incomplete and people needed to go back to the old GWT UI for many of the basic use-cases.

However, things started to change radically in April 2018 when GerritHub.io adopted Gerrit v2.15 which had a 100% functionally complete PolyGerrit UI. The number of users choosing PolyGerrit jumped from 10% to 35% (3.5x times) with a +70% growth in the number of accesses overall. That means that the adoption was mainly driven by users attracted by the new UI.

In the past 12 months, PolyGerrit became the default user-interface and was just renamed as Gerrit UI. Gradually more and more users abandoned the old GWT interface that now represents 30% of the overall accesses.

Timeline of the upgrade

For the 70% of people that are using already using the new Gerrit UI, the upgrade to Gerrit v3.0 would not be noticeable at all:

  • Gerrit v3.0 UI is absolutely identical to the current one in v2.16
  • All existing API and integration points (e.g. Jenkins integration) in Gerrit v3.0 are 100% compatible with v2.16

For the 30% of people that are still using the old GWT UI, things will be very different as their favorite interface will not be available anymore.

The upgrade will happen with zero-downtime across the various GerritHub.io multi-site deployments and will start around mid-June.

Can I still use GWT with GerritHub.io?

The simple answer is NO: Gerrit v3.0 does not contain any GWT code anymore and thus it is impossible for GerritHub.io to bring back the old UI.

The journey to fill the gaps and reach 100% feature and functional equivalence between the old GWT and the new Polymer-based UI took around 6 years, 18k commits and 1M lines of code written by 260+ contributors from 60+ different organizations. It has been tested by hundreds of thousands of developers across the globe and is 100% production-ready and functionally complete.

If you feel that there was “something you could do in the GWT UI and cannot do anymore with the new Polymer-based UI”, please file a bug to the Gerrit Code Review issue tracker and you will get prompt attention and replies from the community.

Can I stay with Gerrit v2.16 on GerritHub.io?

If your organization cannot migrate to Gerrit v3.0, you could still request a dedicated hosting to GerritForge Ltd, which is the company behind GerritHub.io.

Please fill up the GerritForge feedback form and one Sales Representative will come back to you with the possible options and costs associated.

If you fully endorse GerritHub.io with Gerrit v3.0 and start using the new UI, the service will continue to be FREE for public and private repositories, organizations of all types and size. You can optionally purchase Enterprise Support from one of our plans if you require extra help in using and configuring your Gerrit projects with your tools and organization.

Enjoy the future of Gerrit v3.0 with GerritHub.io and GerritForge.

Luca Milanesio, GerritForge Ltd.
Gerrit Code Review Maintainer and Release Manager
Member of the Engineering Steering Committee

Gerrit v3.0 is here

GerritSprintHackathon2019.photo

Gerrit v3.0 has been released during the last Spring Hackathon at Google in Munich involving over 20+ developers for one week.

It can be downloaded from www.gerritcodereview.com/3.0.html and installed on top of any existing Gerrit v2.16/NoteDb installations. Native packages have been distributed through the standard channels and upgrading is as simple as shutting down the service, running the Rpm, Deb or Dnf upgrade command and starting again.

You can also try Gerrit v3.0 using Docker by simply running the following command:

docker run -ti -p 8080:8080 -p 29418:29418 gerritcodereview/gerrit:3.0.0

This article goes through the whole history of the Gerrit v3.0 development and highlights the differences between the previous releases.

Milestone for the Gerrit OpenSource Project

Finally, after 6 years, 18k commits and 1M lines of code written by 260+ contributors from 60+ different organizations, Gerrit v3.0 is finally out.

The event is a fundamental milestone for the project for two reasons:

  • The start of a new journey for Gerrit, without the legacy code of the old GUI based on Google Web Toolkit and without any relational database. Gerrit is now fully based on a Git repository and nothing else.
  • The definition of a clear community organization, with the foundation of a new Engineering Steering Committee and the role of Community Manager.

The new structure will drive the product forward for the years to come and will help to define a clear roadmap to bring back Gerrit at the center of the Software Development Pipeline.

Evolution vs. revolution

When a product release increments the first major number, it typically introduces a series of massive breaking changes and, unfortunately, a period of instability. Gerrit, however, is NOT a typical OpenSource product, because since the beginning it has been based on rigorous Code Review that brought stability and reliability from its initial inception back in 2008. Gerrit v3.0 was developed during the years by following a rigorous backward compatibility rule that has made Gerrit one of the most reliable and scalable Code Review systems on the planet.

For all the existing Gerrit v2.16 installations, the v3.0 will be much more similar to a rather minor upgrade and may not even require any downtime and interruption of the incoming read/write traffic, assuming that you have at least a high-availability setup. How is this possible? Magic? Basically, yes, it’s a “kind of magic” that made this happen, and it is all thanks to the new repository format for storing all the review meta-data: NoteDb.

Last but not least, all the feature that Gerrit v3.0 brings to the table, have been implemented iteratively over the last 6 years and released gradually from v2.13 onwards. Gerrit v3.0 is the “final step” of the implementation that fills the gaps left open in the past v2.16 release.

With regards to statistics of the changes from v2.16 to v3.0, it is clear that the code-base has been basically stabilized and cleaned up, as you can see from the official GerritForge Code Analytics extracted from analytics.gerrithub.io .

  • 1.5k commits from 63 contributors worldwide
  • 62k lines added and 72k lines removed
  • Google, CollabNet, and GerritForge are the top#3 organizations that invested in developing this release

In a nutshell, the Gerrit code-base has shrunk of 10k lines of code, compared to v2.16. So, instead of talking of what’s new in v3.0, we should instead describe what inside the 72k lines removed.

Removal of the GWT UI

The GWT UI, also referred to as “Old UI” has been around since the inception of the project back in 2008.

Gerrit.GWT-UI

Back in 2008, it seemed a good idea to build Gerrit UI on top of GWT, a Web Framework founded by Google two years earlier and aimed at reusing the same Java language for both backend and the Ajax front-end.

However, starting in 2012, things started to change. The interest of the overall community in GWT decreased, as clearly shown by the StackOverflow trends.

Screenshot 2019-05-18 at 23.34.42

In 2015, Andrew Bonventre from the Chromium Project, one of the major users of the Gerrit Code Review platform, apart from the Android Developers, presented the new prototype of the Gerrit Code Review UI, based on the Polymer project, with the code-name of PolyGerrit, and merged as change #72086.

commit ba698359647f565421880b0487d20df086e7f82a
Author: Andrew Bonventre <andybons@google.com>
Date: Wed Nov 4 11:14:54 2015 -0500

Add the skeleton of a new UI based on Polymer, PolyGerrit

This is the beginnings of an experimental new non-GWT web UI developed
using a modern JS web framework, http://www.polymer-project.org/. It
will coexist alongside the GWT UI until it is feature-complete.

The functionality of this change is light years from complete, with
a full laundry list of things that don't work. This change is simply
meant to get the starting work in and continue iteration afterward.

The contents of the polygerrit-ui directory started as the full tree of
https://github.com/andybons/polygerrit at 219f531, plus a few more
local changes since review started. In the future this directory will
be pruned, rearranged, and integrated with the Buck build.

Change-Id: Ifb6f5429e8031ee049225cdafa244ad1c21bf5b5

The PolyGerrit project introduced two major innovations:

  • Gerrit REST-API: for the first time the interaction of the code-review process has been formalized in stable and well-documented REST-API that can be used as “backend contract” for the design of the new GUI
  • The PolyGerrit front-end Team: for the first time, a specific experienced Team focused on user experience and UI workflow was dedicated to rethink and redesign iteratively all the components of the Gerrit Code Review interactions.

The GWT UI and PolyGerrit lived in the same “package” from v2.14 onwards for two years, with the users left with the option to switch between the two. Then in 2018 with v2.16 the PolyGerrit UI became the “default” interface and thus renamed just “Gerrit” UI.

With Gerrit v3.0, the entire GWT code-base in Gerrit has been completely removed with the epic change by David Ostrovsky “Remove GWT UI“, which deleted 33k lines of code in one single commit.

The new Polymer-based UI of Gerrit Code Review is not very different than the one seen in Gerrit v2.16, but includes more bug fixes and is 100% feature complete, including the projects administrations and ACLs configuration.

Screenshot 2019-05-18 at 22.58.13

Removal of ReviewDb

Gerrit v3.0 does not have a DBMS anymore, not even for storing its schema version as it happened in v2.16. This means that almost everything gets stored in the Git repositories.

The journey started back in October 2013, when Shawn Pearce gave to Dave Borowitz the task to convert all the review meta-data managed by Gerrit into a new format inside the Git repository, called NoteDb.

After two years of design and implementation, Dave Borowitz presented NoteDb at the Gerrit User Summit 2015 and called Gerrit v3.0 the release that will be fully working without the need of any other external DBMS (see the full description of the talk at https://storage.googleapis.com/gerrit-talks/summit/2015/NoteDB.pdf).

Google started adopting NoteDb in parallel with ReviewDb on their own internal setup and in June 2017, the old changes table was definitely removed. However, there was more in the todo-list: at the Gerrit User Summit 2017, Dave Borowitz presented the final roadmap to make ReviewDb finally disappear from everyone’s Gerrit server.

Screenshot 2019-05-18 at 23.18.28

In the initial plans, the first version with NoteDb fully working should have been v2.15. However, things went a bit differently and a new minor release was needed in 2018 to make the format really stable and reliable with v2.16.

Gerrit v2.16 is officially the last release that contains both code-bases and allows the migration from ReviewDb to NoteDb.

Dave Borowitz used the hashtag “RemoveReviewDb” to allow anyone to visualize the huge set of commits that removed 35k lines of code complexity from the Gerrit project.

Migrating to Gerrit v3.0, step-by-step

Gerrit v3.0 requires NoteDb as pre-requisite: if you are on v2.16 with NoteDb, the migration to v3.0 is straightforward and can be done with the following simple steps:

  1. Shutdown Gerrit
  2. Upgrade Gerrit war and plugins
  3. Run Gerrit init with the “batch” option
  4. Start Gerrit

If you are running Gerrit in a high-availability configuration, the above process can be executed on the two nodes individually, with a rolling restart and without interrupting the incoming traffic.

If you are running an earlier version of Gerrit and you are still on ReviewDb, then you should upgrade in three steps:

  1. Migrate from your version v2.x (x < v2.16) to v2.16 staying on ReviewDb. Make sure to upgrade through all the intermediate versions. (Example: migrate from v2.13 to v2.14, then from v2.14 to v2.15 and finally from v2.15 to v2.16)
  2. Convert v2.16 from ReviewDb to NoteDb
  3. Migrate v2.16 to v3.0

The leftover of a DBMS stored onto H2 files

Is Gerrit v3.0 completely running without any DBMS at all? Yes and no. There is some leftover that isn’t necessarily associated with the Code Review meta-data and thus did not make sense to be stored in NoteDb.

  • Persistent storage for in-memory caches.
    Some of the Gerrit caches store their status on the filesystem as H2 tables, so that Gerrit can save a lot of CPU time after a restart reusing the previous in-memory cache status.
  • Reviewed flag of changes.
    Represents the flag that enables the “bold” rendering of a change, storing the update status for every user. It is stored by default on the filesystem as H2 table, however, can be alternatively stored on a remote DBMS or potentially managed by a plugin.

New core plugins

Some of the plugins that have been initially distributed only with the Native Packages and Docker versions are now an integral part of the WAR distribution as well:

  • delete-project
    which allows removing a project from Gerrit and the associated changes.
  • gitiles
    a lightweight code-browser created by Dave Borowitz based on JGit
  • plugin-manager
    the interface to discover, download and install Gerrit plugins
  • webhooks
    the HTTP-based remote trigger to schedule remote builds on CI systems or active any other service from a Gerrit event

The above four plugins already existed before Gerrit v3.0, but they were not included in the gerrit.war.

Farewell to Dave Borowitz and the PolyGerrit Team

After having completed the feature parity between GWT and PolyGerrit, the original PolyGerrit Team members left the Gerrit Code Review project.

Their journey came to an end with the release of the new shiny Polymer-based Gerrit UI. The PolyGerrit Team contributed 45k lines of code on 5.3k commits in 4 years.

Then the last event unfolded during the release of Gerrit v3.0: Dave Borowitz announced that he was leaving the Gerrit Code Review project. I defined the event like “Linus Torvalds announcing he was abandoning the Linux Kernel project”.

Dave Borowitz contributed 316k lines of code on 3.6k commits over 36 repositories in 8 years. He helped also the development of the new Gerrit Multi-Site plugin by donating its Zookeeper-based implementation of a global ref-database.

On behalf of GerritForge and the Gerrit Code Review community, I would like to thank all the past contributors and maintainers that made PolyGerrit and NoteDb code-base into Gerrit: Dave, Logan, Kasper, Becky, Viktar, Andrew and Wyatt.

Luca Milanesio – GerritForge
Gerrit Code Review Maintainer, Release Manager
and member of the Engineering Steering Committee

GerritHub is on NoteDb … with a bump

516px-Road-sign-Speed_bump.svg

The 26th of April at 9:10 AM EDT, the 400K changes on GerritHub.io have been successfully migrated to NoteDb.
See below the historical log entry in error_log.2018-04-26

[2018-04-26 09:10:55,429] [OnlineNoteDbMigrator] INFO com.google.gerrit.server.notedb.rebuild.OnlineNoteDbMigrator : Online NoteDb migration completed in 8630s

What is NoteDb?

NoteDb is the next generation of Gerrit storage backend, which replaces the traditional SQL backend for change and account metadata with storing data in the same repository as code changes. In a nutshell, you can access all the reviews from your local Git repository as well by using the “git log -p” command line and even when you are offline, which is really neat.

Whilst all the major competitors of Gerrit Code Review still rely on a traditional DataBase for reviews, NoteDb is innovative and provides many major benefits:

  • Simplicity
    All data is stored in one location in the site directory, rather than being split between the site directory and a possibly external database server.
  • Consistency
    Replication and backups can use a snapshot of the Git repository refs, which will include both the branch and patch set refs, and the change metadata that points to them.
  • Auditability
    Rather than storing mutable rows in a database, modifications to changes are stored as a sequence of Git commits, automatically preserving history of the metadata.
  • Extensibility
    Plugin developers can add new fields to metadata without the core database schema having to know about them.
  • New features
    Enables simple federation between Gerrit servers, as well as offline code review and interoperation with other tools.

Large-scale, world’s first.

GerritHub.io is the first large-scale Gerrit Code Review installation, apart from Google’s of course, that has hit essential records targets:

  1. The world’s most advanced and up-to-date Gerrit release in production: v2.15.1-143
  2. The world’s first NoteDb on-line migration in production

Being the “first” has a lot of advantages because allow people and companies to work faster and more efficiently than the competitors, which is paramount of the modern global economy. However, there are disadvantages as well: being the “first” means that at times you are going into unexplored space, and the road could be bumpy.

See below a summary of what happened yesterday on GerritHub.io during the NoteDb migration.

Timeline of events

06:47 AM – Starting online NoteDb migration

The online migration process starts. All incoming changes and reviews are still happening on ReviewDb, however, Gerrit start creating the /meta refs on the existing changes to translate all the existing DBMS records into Review Notes.

This migration state is called: WRITE (changes are written to both NoteDb and ReviewDb)

07:58 AM – Setting primary storage to NoteDb

The primary storage for new changes is moved to NoteDb. New changes will be stored to NoteDb while existing changes that have been modified between 6:47 AM and 7:58 AM will be delta-migrated and then flagged as “NoteDb only” one by one.

When a new change is created, it will be assigned from a sequence number coming from NoteDb and not anymore from ReviewDb.

08:01 AM – Errors when trying to push new changes to GerritHub.io

One developer of the Python zVM SDK OpenSource project tries to create a new change to GerritHub.io but receives the following error:

$ git push origin HEAD:refs/for/master
Counting objects: 10, done.
Delta compression using up to 4 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (5/5), done.
Writing objects: 100% (10/10), 657 bytes | 0 bytes/s, done.
Total 10 (delta 4), reused 0 (delta 0)
remote: Resolving deltas: 100% (4/4)
remote: Processing changes: new: 1, refs: 1, done
remote:
remote: New Changes:
remote: https://review.gerrithub.io/#/c/mfcloud/python-zvm-sdk/+/407671
remote:
To ssh://balaskoa@review.gerrithub.io:29418/mfcloud/python-zvm-sdk
! [remote rejected] HEAD -> refs/for/master (internal server error: Error inserting change/patchset)

Other errors are appearing with the identical symptoms on other projects. It isn’t, however, a general failure because other new changes are getting through and existing changes are reviewed correctly as expected.

08:36 AM – Problem notified to the Gerrit mailing list

The troubleshooting starts, and it seems that some of the new changes created on NoteDb have sequences in conflict with existing changes on ReviewDb but on other projects.

Not all changes are impacted though, so migration continues.

09:02 AM – Migrated primary storage

All the changes have been migrated and flagged as “NoteDb only”, there will be no more read access to ReviewDb for those.

09:06 AM – Cause identified

A bug has been identified in the code that manages the generation of sequencing numbers for the new changes on NoteDb: the switch to the primary storage to NoteDb has not updated the sequencing number on the All-Projects/refs/sequences/changes and thus new changes created may be conflicting with existing ones on ReviewDb.

09:10 AM – Migration completed

09:49 AM – Acknowledge by Google

Dave Borowitz, the leader of the Gerrit Code Review project, analyzes the discussion topic on the mailing list and agrees on the diagnosis of the issue.

Dave Borowitz words were: “Nice catch, thank you Luca.”

10:02 AM – GerritHub.io production patched, problem resolved.

9:05 PM – A software fix to the Gerrit v2.15 stable branch uploaded

A definite fix for the software glitch is uploaded to Gerrit-Review and is reviewed by the Gerrit Code Review contributors.

The “bump” on the road

Migration is always a pain, and you need to plan it, test and fix all the issues you can potentially verify in a “like-for-like” pre-production environment. However, this time at least, testing had produced a situation that was unprecedented.

When Gerrit was migrated from v2.14 to v2.15.1, traffic has been moved between Data-Centers (DCs), from Canada to Germany and then back to Canada, using a “ping-pong” technique with zero-downtime.
That means that the testing of the on-line migration to NoteDb has been tried *already* on the Canada-DC a few days ago and it actually succeeded and Gerrit stored the “last known sequence number” in ReviewDb into NoteDb.

The second NoteDb migration yesterday followed exactly the same trace of the previous test made on Canada-DC but, this time, the “last known sequence number” was not updated.
That is an “edge-case” that was not foreseen when writing the code and has produced the failures experienced by new changes.

Gerrit NoteDb code is very resilient and immediately detected the situation and avoided to insert and index the changes with conflicting IDs.

Statistics of migration

  • Total migration time: 2h 23m
  • Reaction time to investigate failures: 36m
  • Resolution time: 2h
  • Software fix: 13h
  • Number of changes impacted: 33 over 400k – 0.008%
  • Number of projects impacted: 14 over 14k – 0.1%
  • Data loss: 0%
  • Incidents created and closed: 3

Current situation

No more errors or problems reported, production is stable

GerritHub adopts 100% PolyGerrit

p-logo

GerritHub.io has been successfully migrated Gerrit Code Review v2.15. Thanks to the 5-days Gerrit Hackathon hosted by Axis in Lund, all the remaining issues we had on v2.15 have been resolved and all the 15k active users of GerritHub from today can use the 100% feature complete PolyGerrit UX.

What is PolyGerrit?

PolyGerrit is the code-name of the new UX wholly redesigned using web components, a set of web platform APIs that allow you to create new custom, reusable, encapsulated HTML tags to use in web pages and web apps. Custom components and widgets build on the Web Component standards, will work across modern browsers, and can be used with any JavaScript library or framework that works with HTML.

To access the PolyGerrit, just go to the GerritHub.io footer and click on the link “Switch to New UI” or add “?polygerrit=1” as an extra query string (e.g. https://review.gerrithub.io/?polygerrit=1)

To have a more comprehensive description of PolyGerrit, you can read the previous blog post about the Google talk at the past Gerrit User Summit in London.

Zero-downtime “ping-pong” migration to Gerrit v2.15

As usual, we migrated with near-zero-downtime, with only a “ten minutes *read-only* window” where we were waiting to drain the final replications were moved between Data-Centers.

There are two Data-Centers (DC) active for GerritHub.io; the main one is hosted in Canada and the second in Germany. Both DC have a high-availability configuration and run the same version of Gerrit with the same data. However, during major upgrades, we use a “ping-pong” technique to give a seamless experience to the users.

Ping phase

DC-Canada is with Gerrit v2.14 and DC-Germany gets upgraded to v2.15. Traffic gets forwarded smoothly from DC-Canada to DC-Germany thanks to the HAProxy that is serving traffic for https://review.gerrithub.io.

Pong phase

DC-Canada gets upgraded to v2.15 and DC-Germany sync back to Canada in near-real time. Once the upgrade is complete, the HAProxy forwards back the traffic to DC-Canada.

Benefits of the ping-pong upgrade

There two significant benefits of using the combined zero-downtime rollout with the ping-pong technique:

  1. No general service disruption, minimal read-only time.
    Nobody would notice any significant service disruption on GerritHub.io: the read-only window is a minor service degradation that lasts for only a few minutes. Given that 90% of the traffic is represented by “git fetch/clone” and web browsing, the degradation is hardly noticed by anyone.
  2. Validation of the disaster recovery procedure.
    Because the DC-Germany is used as disaster recovery site, it is essential to make sure that is always working fine and you can actually failover to it at any given time when needed.
    You do not want to find out that the disaster recovery isn’t working when is too late.

What’s new in Gerrit v2.15?

There are many changes in Gerrit v2.15, for the details you can have a look at the Google presentation at the Gerrit User Summit 2017 in London.

In a nutshell, here are the headlines of the most visible changes you will notice:

  1. Support for draft changes and draft patch sets has been completely removed.
    You have now two possible states for a change: WIP (work-in-progress) and Private. All the changes that were in “draft” status at the migration have been moved to WIP state.
  2. New URL Scheme
    Gerrit URLs generated and used by the UI include not just the change number but the project name as well.
    For instance, the Change 123 on project ‘myproject’ would now be accessible on the URL: https://review.gerrithub.io/#/c/myproject/+/123.
    Existing URLs containing only the change number (e.g. https://review.gerrithub.io/123) are redirected to the new scheme.
  3. New workflows on the PolyGerrit UX
    The PolyGerrit UX is now 100% feature complete. It is not only an engineering rewrite but also a whole redesign of the user-flows and experience.
    See at https://www.gerritcodereview.com/releases/2.15.md#new-workflows the details of all the new flows.

What’s next?

Gerrit v2.15 includes a brand-new storage for reviews, code-named “NoteDb”, that is actually your Git repository itself. That means that all the meta-data, comments, scores, history, audit, will all be stored in the same GitHub repository with your code.

Our next step is to perform an online migration from ReviewDb to NoteDb, which will be again with zero-downtime. Thanks to the fantastic work made by Dave Borowitz (Google), there will be no need for a read-only window: you will not even notice.

What do know all the details of Gerrit v2.15?

For an overview of what’s new in GerritHub with v2.15, you can look at the Gerrit User Summit 2017 presentation.

 

Git vs. Subversion – An Executive Decision Guide

svn-vs-git

Subversion or Git ? Making the right choice for your Business.

Git is the fastest growing distributed SCM (source code management) tool. Yet, with 50%+ market share, Apache Subversion continues to be the undisputed leader for SCM in the enterprise. The success of both open source SCM tools provides a dilemma for some organizations, in particular those migrating off legacy systems such as ClearCase, Visual SourceSafe (VSS) or CVS. Should you move to Subversion, to Git – or to both?

Discover all you need to know to make the right choice in theWebinar, organized and sponsored by CollabNet Inc, on Tuesday, August 13, 2013, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PDT.

What we will cover in the Webinar ?

  • Pro’s and Con’s of Git vs. Subversion in the enterprise
  • Proven integration and migration strategies
  • Industry trends and market predictions
  • Security and compliance implications

Do not miss this opportunity to watch the Webinar live and ask questions to GerritForge for making your decisions.

REGISTER NOW at http://visit.collab.net/Webinar_Gitvs.SubversionAnExecutiveDecisionGuide.html

ClearCase Migration Git vs. ClearCase – a Developer’s View

Git is the fastest-growing DVCS (distributed version control system) in the enterprise. It provides a viable alternative to ClearCase – in particular when deployed side-by-side with Subversion or binary repository systems.

We will cover in a technical session provides a developers’s point of view, about pro’s and con’s for Git versus ClearCase. It also provides practical guidelines and reference charts, to enable a smooth transition.

What we cover:

  • Detailed comparison: features and SCM processes
  • How to translate SCM commands, side-by-side
  • Security and scalability – tips and tricks
  • Migration topics – pitfalls and solutions
  • Multi-site replication – Git versus ClearCase

Do not miss the next forthcoming Webinar on how to migrate ClearCase to Git, organised and sponsored by CollabNet Inc.

When ?
Thursday, August 1, 2013, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PST

Where ?
Register now http://visit.collab.net/2013Q3WebinarClearCaseMigrationGitvsClearCaseaDevelopersView.html