Gerrit User Summit 2017, 2-3 Oct, London

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New and exciting features are coming for this year Gerrit User Summit, with the launch of Ver. 2.15, NoteDb, high-availability, multi-master and much more.

The Summit will take place for the very first time in Europe, London, the location chosen by the community after a public consultation, the 2nd and 3rd of October at CodeNode (Skills Matter).

There are still a few places available but hurry up and register now at https://gerritusersummit.eventbrite.com.

See below an overview of the topics that will be presented and discussed during the User Summit.

What’s new in Gerrit 2.14.x.

Gerrit v2.14 was released during the last Hackathon in April and has gone through three patch releases. David Pursehouse from CollabNet will give an overview of the new features introduced which would be highly beneficial for all of those who haven’t migrated yet.

Gerrit at Google: Multi-master, Mutli-tenant.

Google is the founder, main contributor and possibly the most advanced user of the Gerrit Code Review: learning from their experience is a unique opportunity to learn and being able to leverage and use the tool at its best.

Patrick Hiesel from Google will go through the insights of their Gerrit Code Review architecture and will provide some of their metrics of scale. In addition to that, he will present some findings from the recent switch of their load-balancing infrastructure and the associated pitfalls encountered.

Google is possibly the only one in the world using Gerrit in a multi-tenant setup, having a unique multi-master installation that serves a constellation of domains and projects, including huge and familiar ones like Android and Chromium.

Standing “on the shoulders of giants” like Google helps a lot in preventing scalability issues as the audience and adoption of Gerrit Code Review grows in large companies: being part of the audience in the talk is a unique opportunity to learn and ask questions directly to the maintainers of their infrastructure.

PolyGerrit: a new UX experience for Gerrit Code Review

Google has invested a lot in reinventing and reengineering the user interface of Gerrit Code Review, which remained mostly unchanged for almost a decade. A new team has been put together in their San Francisco offices with experienced UX developers that leveraged the new Polymer framework of web components.

The result is PolyGerrit, a modern web UX which provides an unprecedented browsing speed and flexible rendering across different devices, including mobile and tablets.

The PolyGerrit Team will be presenting the findings of their user-experience research and show some of the features and insights of the new UX.

Gerrit CI and keeping logs forever.

Gerrit Code Review itself is a large project, involving over 300 developers across the globe and using the most advanced DevOps practices. The CI/CD pipeline has been provided and managed by GerritForge on the https://gerrit-ci.gerritforge.com and Luca Milanesio from GerritForge will present the latest improvements in the pipeline plus an interesting way of collecting and reusing the logs.

Leveraging the logs for identifying the bottlenecks of the CI/CD pipeline is the way to drive improvement. GerritForge leveraged the expertise of his engineers to harvest and organize data and will give it back to the community as powerful dashboards.

Beyond Gerrit.

Gerrit is great. However, it is also quite an important part of a bigger ALM process. Jacek Centkowski from CollabNet will describe how multiple tools can be unified under a single TeamForge umbrella and what are the immediate benefits of it.

What’s coming in Gerrit 2.15

After only four months, we are already close to the v2.15 of Gerrit Code Review, which would be possibly the last one before the step to the v3.0.

Dave Borowitz from Google, principal maintainer of the Gerrit Code Review project, will go through the new features of v2.15 and possibly give a glimpse in what to expect from v3.0.

Mining Gerrit Data to Study Contentious Reviews and Community Evolution

Gerrit Code Review is much more than a tool, it is a way for people working together in companies that are large and mostly distributed across the globe.

Shane McIntosh from McGill University has been running a research lab on this topic. The Software REBELs—a research lab at McGill University—mine code review data to study topics like the impact that code review practices have on software release and design quality. Our more recent work mines code review data to study the reviewing process itself. In this talk, I will describe the results of two empirical studies of data that we collected from the Gerrit instances of the OpenStack project. The first study aims to understand the reviews where reviewers disagree about a patch. The second study follows how the concerns that reviewers raise evolve as the OpenStack community ages and individual reviews accrue experience.

Gerrit Analytics: dashboards, networks, KPI

Gerrit has always been lacking major code analytics features compared to other Git Server tools like GitBlit or GitLab. GerritForge Ltd is filling the gap and adds one important asset to the Gerrit Code Review platform: code review analytics.

We need to harvest and unify the logs and events coming from the different components of the CI/CD pipeline by putting at the center of it the people and teams that are building and discussing the code on Gerrit. The resulting data-lake of information can be later analyzed and correlated to calculate the cycle time of the entire pipeline.

Luca Milanesio from GerritForge will show the new analytics dashboards that are going to be published and provided back to the Team that is developing the Gerrit Code Review project as a precious contribution to the community.

How to extend Gerrit using Scripting Plugins

Gerrit Code Review has a robust set of API that can be used to extend its functionalities and provide a more integrated development workflow for the Teams.

Luca Milanesio from GerritForge will present how to use different scripting tools to extend the capabilities of Gerrit without the need of developing and building a plugin, using Jython, Groovy and Scala.

A new simpler but powerful Gerrit Jenkins plugin

Gerrit Code Review is an essential part of a larger CI/CD pipeline. Most of the times it is used in conjunction with Jenkins, the most popular OpenSource Continuous Integration and Delivery tool.

The integration between Gerrit and Jenkins (Gerrit Trigger Plugin) was developed back in 2010 at Sony and since then has been extended and adopted in thousands of Jenkins installations. However, Jenkins has evolved too and has now a brand new concept and definition of multi-branch pipeline which struggles to be seamlessly integrated with the current Gerrit Trigger Plugin.

Luca Milanesio from GerritForge will present a brand new plugin based on the new Jenkins branch discovery API which works seamlessly with Jenkins multi-branch pipelines and provides a simpler interface with Gerrit by leveraging the new WebHooks.

Diffy with enterprise grade

Since 2012 CollabNet has been working on improving Gerrit integration with TeamForge. Many features have been created to satisfy the needs of enterprise customers. Eryk Szymanski from CollabNet will present features like RBAC, history protection, Git style notifications, quality gates, pull request and code browser which have been implemented on top of vanilla Gerrit.

Q&A with the maintainers

Have you ever wondered why something is working in a certain way? Have you ever wanted to explain any complaint about some parts of Gerrit? Would you give your congratulation to the people that made this project? Would you like to make a feature request or propose new ideas?

This is the moment where you can speak directly face-to-face to the people that are building this project every single day, the Gerrit maintainers.


The event is free for everyone, thanks to the contribution of our sponsors, CollabNet Inc, GerritForge Ltd and Skills Matter Ltd.

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Code Review Analytics at Gerrit User Summit

I love hiking mountains; I always did since I was a child. There is a mix of challenges, enthusiasm, and learnings in walking for long hours through little and tortuous steep trails: it challenges your mind and body and makes you stronger.

One thing that always fascinated me is how the shape of peaks and valleys changes as you go higher and raise your perspective. When finally, exhausted, you reach the mountain peak you have a mix of pleasure and relief. You have achieved your goal, and you can, at last, have the full view on the horizon, understand how mountain chains are linked together, where rivers start and end up in lakes, and you can see far away as never before.

Continuous Delivery is a landscape of rivers, lakes, and mountains

I believe today’s landscape of Software Engineering is very diverse: there are so many powerful tools that generate streams of data continuously, and we need to get on top of them every day to be successful in an ever-evolving market space.
Continuous Delivery is the key methodology that nowadays allows the entire “software production chain” working smoothly. However, it poses challenges which are not always technical but often related to the flow of information across the systems and people.

See the big picture

To succeed, we need to raise our point of view to see the “big picture” and understand how things are connected and where are the improvement points, considering all the data we have about:

  • Tools
    collect software and system metrics, logs, test results, build trends
  • Projects
    repositories, commits, branches, pull requests, patch sets
  • People and Teams
    active and passive collaborators, contributors, reviewers, comments and replies

Collecting data is not enough, we need to raise our point of view and hike the Continuous Delivery mountain of problems and reach a point where all those elements make sense because they are:

  • all visible from a single perspective
  • correlated
  • aggregated

Yet another BigData problem

The problem is too many data sources to manage.
The typical solution to the problem is taking all logs from everywhere and publishing them to a single repository using an ELK (ElasticSearch + Logstash + Kibana) stack and building fancy dashboards. I have used this approach for small-scale projects, and it works quite well, but … when I tried to scale that to a much bigger Continuous Delivery pipeline the complexity, diversity, and granularity of data just killed my ability to see the “bigger picture” and I felt almost helpless in front of my Kibana dashboards.

Back to the source of data

Trying to understand what was missing, I ended up realizing that some of the dimensions were not taken into account and correlated: Code Reviews.

All the tooling were about test results, build, system and application logs but none of them has taken the code into account, which is the source of all the pipeline. You can understand where to go if you realize where you are coming from: the code is the source of all build chains.
When I started collecting data from the code repository and reviews, all made sense again, and I felt the I have reached the peak of my Continuous Delivery hiking effort: all made sense again and I could see the overall perspective.

Continuous Delivery Analytics

Exactly in the same way we Application Analytics are used to collecting data about our production system, split into dimensions and analyzed, we need then to start doing the same with our Continuous Delivery pipeline.

There are already some of the tools out there in the market which integrates some parts of it, but I haven’t seen a single one who can give you the bird’s eye perspective you need to understand the big picture.

That’s why I started writing one, using the only way make sense for me: writing in the open and with the help and cooperation of the OpenSource community of people and companies who share the same problem and have the same perspective.

Gerrit Analytics coming at the User Summit 2016

I presented my ideas at a couple of conferences (Devoxx, JenkinsWorld) and I received a lot of appreciation and feedback: the next one is the Gerrit User Summit in Mountain View – CA.

Large companies like SAP, Qualcomm, Ericsson,  Google and Intel are exchanging every year their problems and ideas on how to make their Continuous Delivery Pipelines smoother, better and faster.
The perspective will be, of course, more Gerrit Code Review centric with more data and views that make sense from a review perspective.

Call to action

Come to the Gerrit User Summit 2016 in Mountain View – Google HQ on the 12th and 13th of November, and see the Gerrit and Continuous Delivery Pipeline in Action.

The event is FREE, register now at https://goo.gl/forms/oeEnQweHl2noNSnn1