Happy New Year, Gerrit Code Review

It has been a hectic and productive year for ourselves at GerritForge and the Gerrit Code Review Community.
We want to take this opportunity to recap some of the milestones of the 2019 and the exciting perspectives for 2020 and beyond.

Gerrit Code Review, 2019 in numbers

gerrit-2019-commits.png

Gerrit had over 120+ contributors from all around the world coming from 33 different companies and organisations, which is excellent. There is a robust 6% increase in the number of commits (+231 commits) but a reduction in the number of contributors (-7 authors).

With regards to the overall trend of commits during the year, the success of the Gerrit User Summit 2019 in Sunnyvale is visible, with an increase of the rate of commits around October/November.

Top-three projects of the 2019

  1. Gerrit (1,626 commits) is, of course, the most active project. However, it is visibly down in terms of number of commits from 2018 (-19%). That is a consequence of the shift of focus to the other two key components listed below, which are available as plugins and then not accounted for the overall gerrit core repository statistics.
  2. Checks (315 commits) is the brand-new 1st class CI integration API for external build systems, such as Jenkins and Zuul. It is incredible how in just 12 months it has become robust and fully mature. It is currently used for the validation of all changes on the Gerrit project.
  3. Multi-site (234 commits) is the long-awaited support for Gerrit that everyone has been waiting for years. It is finally available for all active and supported versions (from 2.16+ onwards).

Top-three companies contributing to Gerrit

gerrit-contributors-2019.png

  1. Google is, with no surprise, still the top contributor of the Gerrit project overall. It is basically stable from 2018 (around 43%) as a confirmation of the continued commitment to the project.
  2. GerritForge is growing significantly in the contribution to the project, with exactly half of the contributions of Google. This is a significant result from 2018 with a 7% growth of involvement.
  3. CollabNet is sliding to the 3rd position (it was 2nd in 2018) with a 3% decrease of contributions. As noticeable mention, however, David Pursehouse from CollabNet is still the number #1 maintainer in terms of number of commits.

Even if it is outside the top#3 contributors companies, SAP deserves a special mention for its continuous involvement in the JGit project, which is at the basis of Gerrit engine, and its fantastic engagement in improving the Gerrit CI system and integrating it with the checks plugin.

Top-three achievements from GerritForge

The outstanding results of contributions of GerritForge in 2019 have been focused on three major topics.

Gerrit multi-site, released and production ready

We released the Gerrit Multi-Site plugin, allowing seamless balancing in a distributed environment, a technologically highly advanced development, crucial for very distributed companies. See https://gerrit.googlesource.com/plugins/multi-site for more information.

Gerrit User Summits in Europe, USA and streaming

We successfully organised and executed the Gerrit User Group in Europe and the US. The event was very well received by the community with an overall attendance of some 87 on-site and 38 in streaming. Have a look at https://gitenterprise.me/2019/12/23/gerrit-user-summit-survey/ for interesting feedback on those from the attendees.
We opened our own local office in Sunnyvale, in the heart of Silicon Valley. A crucial move to better serve our ever-expanding US customer base.

Gerrit Analytics for the Android Open-Source Project

We kickstarted the Gerrit Analytics for the Android open-source project initiative: after the successful adoption of the automatic collection of code metrics on the Gerrit project (see https://analytics.gerrithub.io) the Android team asked GerritForge to start working on extracting the same metrics from their code.

What’s coming in 2020

Gerrit v3.2 is currently under development and it is planned to be released around April/May 2020. It represents a major milestone for the Gerrit project with the support for Java 11 and large JVM heaps, up to hundreds of GBytes. Gerrit v3.2 is definitely the release that everyone that has a big repository (mono-repos) should target as next upgrade. See the Gerrit .roadmap at https://www.gerritcodereview.com/roadmap.html for more details about the planned features.

More work and improvements on the checks plugin, with the aim of fully integrating it into everyone’s user-journey and their CI/CD pipeline. Our first blog-post of 2020 will be how to use Jenkins and Checks plugin together with GerritHub.io.

Multi-site and HA will become more integrated with Gerrit, with the aim of moving parts of their technologies (e.g. global ref-db) into JGit and thus used in Gerrit core.

The Gerrit User Summit 2020 will continue the experiment of cross-pollination with other communities, after the success of the interactions with the JGit and OpenStack communities in 2019. Bazel is the next target, as it is used as the de-facto standard build system for Gerrit and its plugins.


 

Again, Best wishes from your friends at GerritForge and looking forward to a continuing successful partnership in the coming years.

Luca Milanesio
Gerrit Maintainer, Release Manager and member of the ESC.

Gerrit User Summit Survey

The 2019 has been an exceptional year, with the introduction of the next generation of Gerrit Code Review v3 releases and the largest ever Gerrit User Summit in the whole history of 11 years of the project.

As a community we want to improve even further and make the project and the community even better. Collecting metrics has been key for the improvements of the Gerrit product and its performance and, similarly, collecting feedback from the community events is the key to grow and increase the participation and sharing of the experiences about Gerrit Code Review.

Survey results

We have run a survey directed to all of those who have attended the two Gerrit User Summits this year, in Gothenburg and Sunnyvale. See below the executive summary of the results.

Did you achieve your objectives at the Summit?

Screenshot 2019-12-23 at 08.41.14

All of the attendees achieved their objective, which were different for the people, depending on their position and role in the community.

  • Getting the latest news of what’s happening in the Gerrit community and open-source product
  • Meeting the existing members of the community and welcome new contributors
  • Networking with the other Gerrit admin and users around the world
  • Influencing with ideas the future Gerrit roadmap

Overall, how would you rate the event?

Screenshot 2019-12-23 at 08.47.44

Over 76% of the people rated the event very good or excellent. However, as we strive for improvement, there is a substantial 24% of of people that are looking for a better event next year.

What did you like/dislike?

The positives of the event have been:

  • Presentation of the Gerrit roadmap and associated discussions
  • Successful mix of topics, including Zuul and JGit
  • People, atmosphere, friendship and networking
  • High quality of the talks and content

The not so positive sides where:

  • The summit covering the weekend
  • Too focused on Gerrit contributors and admins, no space for users
  • There was too much people for the chosen location
  • The talks and discussions went over the planned schedule

How organized was the event?

Screenshot 2019-12-23 at 08.56.17

89% of the people considered the event very well organized, whilst 11% are looking for improvement, possibly with a bigger venue and better timing.

What topics would you like to see covered next year?

  • Evolution of the User-Interface, roundtable with developers, user-journeys
  • Migration talks and discussions
  • CI/CD integration
  • Monitoring
  • Load testing
  • GitHub integration and pull-requests
  • Gerrit with large clusters
  • User-stories on using Gerrit

Would you like to have a workshop next year?

Screenshot 2019-12-23 at 09.02.56

The vast majority of people would like the next year event to be more informative, including a workshop for learning some of the features of Gerrit Code Review.

What would be the best time for the Summit next year?

Screenshot 2019-12-23 at 09.04.47

For the majority of people (75%) the best time for next year event would be two days during the week, rather than having it again over the weekend.


Thanks everyone again for attending the Gerrit User Summit 2019 in Gothenburg and Sunnyvale, and thanks to GerritForge, Volvo Cars and Google for sponsoring it. We are looking forward to seeing you next year.

Luca Milanesio (GerritForge)
Gerrit Code Review Maintainer, Release Manager and ESC Member.

 

Gerrit User Summit LIVE!

Screenshot 2019-10-16 at 06.46.06

The Gerrit User Summit 2019 is going live and allows anyone to join and participate from across the world.

There are only 30 days left for the Gerrit User Summit 2019, the 12th annual event of the Gerrit Code Review community. It is the year of the records, with Gerrit reaching its largest audience ever in its 11 years of history:

  • Over 120 seats
  • People coming from 27 countries
  • 2 major dates and locations, in Sweden and in the USA
  • 20 talks and presentations
  • All seats sold out 2 months before the event

This is also a historical moment for the community because, for the first time since 2011, the JGit and Gerrit contributors will get together and talk to each other face to face, strengthening the cooperation between the two projects.

Do not miss the event, go live

We have received an enormous amount of requests to join the event on-site in Sunnyvale, much more than any previous year: the event was sold out on Eventbrite 2 months before the starting date.

GerritForge has then decided to invest further funding in sponsorship to organise a full live coverage of the event.

How to participate?

GerritForge has launched a new live event broadcasting site, https://live.gerritforge.com.

Watching the event will be FREE OF CHARGE and without adverts, thanks to the sponsorship by GerritForge. To assure the maximum quality of the video, there is a limit of on-line watchers and a pre-registration is needed.

  1. Go to https://live.gerritforge.com
  2. Click on the “Register to Watch” orange button
  3. Enter your full name, e-mail, company name and country of origin
  4. Click “Register to Watch” green button on the bottom of the page

The live event will allow remote attendants to ask questions and interact with the audience in Sunnyvale: it is going to be truly interactive and useful for the whole JGit and Gerrit community.

What to expect from the Sunnyvale event?

The Sunnyvale event includes a huge number of innovations on the JGit and Gerrit projects.

  • The introduction of the Git ref-table for repositories with huge number of refs
  • Support for Git protocol v2 in Gerrit
  • Git / Gerrit plugin for Gatling, for generating consistent end to end and load tests on Gerrit
  • Zuul support for the new Gerrit’s Checks CI integration
  • Introduction of Gerrit Code Review Analytics for the Android open-source project
  • Frictionless and zero downtime upgrades for Gerrit
  • and many more talks and presentations

Your last chance to attend, reserve your live spot now

There are brand-new ways this year to get in touch and be part of the Gerrit User Summit 2019.

Reserve your live spot today by registering at https://live.gerritforge.com and be part of this record event for the JGit and Gerrit Code Review community.

Luca Milanesio
Gerrit maintainer, release manager and ESC member

 

Gerrit User Summit at Volvo Cars

gerrit-user-summit-volvo-cars

The 2019 is a year of the Summit innovations

The Gerrit User Summit 2019 can definitely be defined as truly innovative in its format and audience.

For the first time in the Gerrit history, the Summit is split into two parts. Volvo Cars have hosted the first in Gothenburg (Sweden) while the second will take place from the 11th to the 17th of November at GerritForge Inc. HQ in Sunnyvale, CA (USA).

The Summit has been repeated on both sides of the Atlantic: the European and US communities come from different background and have different needs. The Gerrit Code Review Community is global and is willing to share experiences and receive feedback from both sides.

A truly open Gerrit Hackathon

We are also innovating on the Hackathon perspective, with three new elements:

  1. The Hackathon is now open to everyone, including the people that have never contributed to Gerrit before. Experienced maintainers have paired with newbies to guide through the very first contributions.
  2. The Hackathon at Volvo Cars has been 100% focused in triaging the massive backlog of open issues and fixing as many bugs as possible for the latest three supported branches: stable-3.0, stable-2.16 and stable-2.15.
  3. The OpenStack and Gerrit communities finally have met and started talking and interacting more closely.

Read the full story on gerritcodereview.com/news.html

The full summary of the event has been published on the Gerrit Code Review project news, read what happened in Gothenburg and, if you are in the USA, do not miss the next forthcoming Gerrit User Summit USA in Sunnyvale.

Hurry up as the seats are running out, REGISTER NOW to avoid missing the event.

Luca Milanesio (GerritForge Ltd)
Gerrit Maintainer, Release Manager, ESC member

Gerrit User Summit 2019

gothenburg-sunnyvale

The Gerrit User Summit 2019 is approaching fast, with new exciting features and a brand-new Gerrit v3.0 release to present and discuss together.

The event is FREE but you need to register in advance for the Gerrit User Summit 2019 on Eventbrite.

One Summit, two events

The Gerrit User Summit & Hackathon is composed of two different events and locations, one in Sweden (Europe), hosted and sponsored by Volvo Cars, and another in California (USA) in the new GerritForge Inc. HQ. Having two separate events in two different quarters will allow most of the community around the globe to attend and share their experience and ideas.

Hackathon open to new contributors

The first part of the event is a 5-days Hackathon reserved for the current Gerrit contributors and maintainers plus anyone that is willing to start contributing to the platform. Differently, from the previous years, the community is now welcome even people that have not contributed to Gerrit before but they are willing to do so.

It is a fantastic opportunity for people to join, work side-by-side and pair with the Gerrit maintainers for a whole week. It can be a unique opportunity to implement the features that you always wanted to see in Gerrit and learning how we develop and review our changes.

The Summit

The usual 2-days Users Summit after the Hackathon is opened to all the members of the community or who is willing to adopt Gerrit Code Review in their development process in the near future.

This year there are a number of exciting news:

  • The introduction of an official Gerrit Community Process with an Engineering Steering Committee and Community Managers
  • Gerrit v3.0 and the full migration to NoteDb and PolyGerrit
  • The multi-site plugin goes OpenSource for allowing anyone to run multiple masters on different sites

The full schedule of the event is available on the Gerrit User Summit 2019 site.

Proposing a new talk

More talks and customer stories are scheduled and, if you have something to tell to the rest of the community, you can submit your talk by creating a change and push to Gerrit Summit 2019 repository:

  1. Open the repository commands age at https://gerrit-review.googlesource.com/admin/repos/summit/2019,commands
  2. Click on “CREATE CHANGE”
  3. Select “master” branch, put your description and create the new change
  4. Click on “Edit” on the top-right of the page
  5. Click on “Open” in the mid toolbar and open the page you would like to edit.

For proposing a new session, you need to add one file with the name of your talk into the sessions folder, using the template.md as an example.

Where and when

Volvo Cars HQ at their HQ in Gothenburg (Sweden)

  • 24-28th August 2019 – Gerrit Hackathon Europe
  • 29-30th August 2019 – Gerrit User Summit Europe

GerritForge Inc HQ in Sunnyvale CA (USA)

  • 11-15th November 2019 – Gerrit Hackathon USA
  • 16-17th November 2019 – Gerrit User Summit USA

Thanks to our sponsors

I would like to thank Volvo Cars and Nicholas Mucci for hosting, sponsoring and organizing the Gerrit User Summit Europe in Gothenburg (Sweden) and GerritForge for hosting and sponsoring the events in both Europe and the USA in Sunnyvale CA (USA).

Luca Milanesio
Gerrit Code Review Maintainer and Release Manager
Member of the Engineering Steering Committee

 

 

 

 

Gerrit: OpenSource and Multi-Site

One more recording from the Gerrit User Summit 2018 at Cloudera in Palo Alto.

Luca Milanesio, Gerrit Code Review Maintainer and Release Manager, presented the current status of the support for multi-master and multi-site setups with the standard OpenSource Components, developed by GerritForge and the Gerrit Code Review Community.

Introduction

The focus of this talk is sharing with you one experience that we did with the Gerrit server that we maintained, GerritHub.

First of all, I’m just going to tell you how we went through the journey from a single master-slave installation back in 2013 to a fully multi-site setup across two continents.

The evolution of GerritHub to multi-site

GerritHub was born in November 2013. The idea was straightforward. It was just an idea on how to take a single Gerrit server and put the replication plug-in to push to GitHub.

To implement a good and scalable and reliable architecture, you don’t need to design everything up front. At the beginning of your journey, you don’t know who your users are, how many repos are going to create, what the traffic looks like, what the latency looks like: you know nothing.

You need to start small, and we did back in 2013, with a single Gerrit master located in Germany, because we had no idea of where the users would have come from.

Would the people in Europe like it, or rather the people in the U.S. like it, or again the people in China like it? We did not know. So we started with one in Germany.

Screenshot 2019-03-03 at 00.07.01

Because we wanted to make a self-service system what we did was very simple: a simple plugin called, “The GitHub plug-in”. That was just a wizard to add an entry in the replication config.

You have Gerrit incoming traffic, then you configure replication, plugin and eventually push to GitHub. The only complicated part here is that if you do it as a Gerrit administrator you have to define these remotes in the replication.config but you can express it in an optimized way. On a self-service system, you’ve got 1000s of people then will create 1000s remotes automatically. Luckily, the replication plugin works very well and was able to cope with it very well.

Moving to Canada

Then we evolved. The reason why we changed is that people started saying ‘Listen, GerritHub is cool, I can use it, works well in the morning. Why in the afternoon is so slow?“. Uh oh.

We needed to do some data mining to see precisely who was using it, where they were coming from, and what operations they were doing. Then we realized that we had chosen the wrong location because we decided that we wanted to put the Gerrit master in Germany, but the majority of people are coming from the USA.

Depending on how the backbone between the Atlantic Ocean was performing, GerritHub could be faster or slower. One of the complaints that they were saying is that in the morning, GitHub was slower than GerritHub, but in the afternoon it was exactly the opposite.

We were doing some performance tuning and analyzing the traffic, and even when people were saying that it’s very slow, actually GerritHub was a lot faster than GitHub in terms of throughput. The problem was the number of hops between the end user and GerritHub.

We decided that we needed to move from Germany to the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. We could have done to move the service to the USA but we decided to go with Canada because the latency was precisely the same as hosting in the USA but less expensive.

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.19.34

What we could have done is just to move the Master from Germany to the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, but because, from the beginning, we wanted to give a service that is always available, we decided to keep both zones.

We didn’t want to have any downtime, even in this migration. We wanted, definitely, to do one step at a time. No changes in releases, no changes in configurations, only moving stuff around. Whenever you change something, even if it’s a small release change, you change the function, and that has to be properly communicated.

If we were changing data center and version, when something goes wrong, you would have the doubt of what it is. Would it be the new version that is slower or the new data center that is slower? You don’t know. If you change one thing at a time, it must be that thing that wasn’t working.

We did the migration in two steps.

  • Step-1: The Gerrit master in Germany, still the replication to GitHub, and the new master in Canada was just one extra replication end.

    The traffic was still coming on this side of the master, but it was replicated to both Canada and the other GitHub. Then, when that was stable, so we were doing all the testing, the other master was used as it was at Gerrit slave, but was not a slave, all the nodes were master, with just a different role.

  • Step-2: Flip the switch the Gerrit master is in Canada. When replication was online and everything was aligned, we have put a small read-only plug on the German side, which was making the whole node read-only for a few minutes, to give time to the last replication queue to drain.When the replication queue was drained, we flipped the switch, when it was going to the new master it was already read/write.

The people didn’t change their domain, didn’t notice any difference, apart from the much-improved performance. The feedback was like “Oh my, what have you done to GerritHub since yesterday? It’s so much faster. It has been never so fast before.
Because it was the same version, and we were testing in parallel for quite some time, nobody had a single disruption.

Zero-downtime migration leveraging multi-site

But that was not enough, because we wanted to keep Gerrit always up and running and always up to date with the latest and greatest version. Gerrit is typically released twice a year; however, the code-base is stable in every single commit.
However, we were still forced to do the ping pong between the two data centers when we were doing our roll out. It means that every time that an upgrade was done, users had a few minutes of read-only state. That was not good enough, because we wanted to release more frequently.

When you upgrade Gerrit within the same release, let’s say between 2.15.4 and 2.15.5, the process is really straight forward, because you just replace the .war, restart Gerrit, done.

However, If you don’t have at least two nodes on either side, you need to ping pong between the two different data centers, then apply the read-only window, which isn’t great.
We started with a second server on the central node so each node can deal with the entire traffic of GerritHub. We were not concerned about the German side, because we were just using it as disaster recovery.

Going multi-site: issues

We started doubling the Canadian side with one extra server. Of course, if you do that with version v2.14 which problem do you have?

  • Sessions. So, how do you share the sessions? If you login into one Gerrit server, you create one session, then you go to the other and you don’t have have a session anymore.
  • Caches. That is easier to resolve, you just put the TTL of the cache to a very low value, put some stickiness, you may sort this out. However, cache consistency is another problem and needs to be sorted.
  • Indexes are the very painful one, because, at that time there was no support for ElasticSearch. Now things are different, but back in 2017, it wasn’t there.
    What happens is that every single node has its own index. If an index entry is stale, it’s not right until someone is going to re-index.

The guys from Ericsson were developing a high availability plugin. We said instead of reinventing the wheel, why don’t we use a high availability plugin? We started rolling it out to GerritHub and actually, the configuration is more complex and looks like this one.

So, imagine you’ve got in Canada you’ve got two different masters, still only one in Germany. They align the consistency of the Lucene index and the cache through the HA plugin and they still use the replication plugin.

How do you share the repository between the two? You need to have a shared file system. We use what exactly the same used by Ericsson, NFS.

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.21.36

Then, for exposing the service we needed HAProxy, not just one but at least two. If you put one HAProxy, you’re not HA anymore, because if that HA proxy dies, your service goes down. So, you have two HAProxy, they must have a cross configuration’s, it means that both of them, they can redirect traffic to one master or the second master, it’s not one primary and the second backup: they have exactly the same role. They do exactly the same thing, they contain exactly the same code, they’ve got exactly the same cache, exactly the same index. They’re both running at the same time. They’re both accepting traffic.

This is something similar to what Martin Fick (Qualcomm) did, I believe, last year, with the only difference that they did not use HAProxy but only DNS round-robin.

Adoption of the high-availability plugin

Based on the experience of running this configuration on GerritHub, we started contributing a lot of fixes to the high-availability plugin.

A lot of people are asking “Oh, GerritHub is amazing. Can you sell me GerritHub?”. I reply with “What do you mean exactly?”

GerritHub is just a domain name that I own, with Gerrit 2.15, plus a bunch of plugins: replication plugin, GitHub plugin, the high-availability plugin (we use a fork), the web session flat file and a bunch of scripts to implement the health check.

If you guys want to do your own, the same configuration, you don’t need to buy any commercial product. We don’t sell commercial products. We just put the ideas into the OpenSource community to make it happen. Then if you need Enterprise Support, we can help you implement it.

The need for a Gerrit disaster-recovery site

Then we needed to do something more because we had one problem. OVH had historically been very reliable, but, of course, shit happens sometimes.
It happened one day that OVH network backbone was down for a few hours.

That means that any server that was on that Data-Center was absolutely unreachable. You couldn’t even connect to them, you couldn’t even check their status, zero. We turned the traffic to the disaster recovery side, but then we faced a different challenge because we had only one master.
It means that if something happens to that master, I don’t know, a peak, or whatever, is becoming a little bit unhealthy, then we are going to have an outage. We didn’t want to risk to have an outage in that situation.

So we moved to Germany with two servers, OVH with two servers, and afterward, we migrated to Gerrit v2.15 and NoteDb.

Your disaster recovery side is never really safe until you are going to need and use it. Then use it all the times, on a regular basis. This is what we ended up to implement.

We have now two different data centers, managed by two different cloud providers. One is still OVH with Canada, and the other is Hetzner in Germany. We still have the same configuration, HA plugin over a shared NFS, so this one is completely replicated into the disaster recovery site, and we are using the disaster recovery continuously to make sure that is always healthy and aligned.

Leverage Gerrit-DR site for Analytics

Because we didn’t want to serve actual user traffic on the disaster recovery site, because of the synchronization lag between the two sides, we ended up using for all the data mining activities. There is a lot of things that we do on data, trying to understand how our system performs. There is a universe of data that typically either never looked at or you don’t really extract and process in the right way.

Have you ever noticed how much data Gerrit generates under the logs directory? A tremendous amount of data and that data tells you exactly the stories that you want to know. It tells you exactly how Gerrit works today, what I need to do to makes sure that Gerrit will work tomorrow, how functions are performing for the end users, if something has blown up, it’s all there.

We started really long ago to work on that DevOps Analytics space, and we started providing that metrics and insights data for the Gerrit Code Review project itself and reporting it back to the Gerrit Code Review project through the service https://analytics.gerrithub.io.

Therefore we started using the disaster recovery site for analytics traffic because if I do an extraction and processing of my data on my logging, on my activities, is there really a need for an analysis of the visit of 10 seconds ago or not? A small time lag on data doesn’t make any difference from an analytics’s perspective.

Screenshot 2019-03-03 at 00.19.54.png

We were running Gerrit v2.15 here, so the HA plugin needed to be radically different from the one that it is today. We are still massively on the HA plugin fork, but all the changes have been pushed for review on the high availability.

However, the solution was still not good enough because there were still some problems. The problem is that the HA plugin within the same data center relies on the shared file system. We knew within the same data center that was not a problem. But, what about creating an NFS across data-centers in different continents? It would never work effectively because of the latency limitations.

We then started with a low tech solution: rely on the replication plugin for the Git data in the repository. Then every 30 minutes, there was a cronjob that was checking the consistency between the two and then does a delta re-index between the different sites.

Back in Gerrit v2.14, I needed to do as well a database export and import, because contained the reviews.

But, there was also the timing problem: in case of a disaster occurred, people will have to wait for half an hour to get the data after re-index.
They would have not lost anything because the index can be recreated at any time, but the user experience was not ideal. And also, you’ve got the DNS related issues for going from one zone to the other.

Sharding Gerrit across sites

First of all, we want to leverage the sharding based on the repository, available from Gerrit 2.15, which include the project name in each page or REST-API URLs. That allows achieving basic sharding across different nodes even with a simple OpenSource HAProxy or other Workload Balancer, without having the magic of the Google intelligent Gerrit/Git proxy. Bear in mind this is not pure sharding, because all the nodes keep on having all the repositories available on every node. HAProxy is going to be clever and based on the project name and action, will use the most appropriate backend for the reads and writes operation. In that way, we are making sure that you never push on the same repository on the same branch from two different nodes concurrently.

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.23.16

How magic works? The replication plugin takes care of synching the nodes. Historically with master-slave, the synchronization was unidirectional. With multi-site instead, all masters are replicating to each other. It means that the first master will replicate to the second and the other way around. Thanks to the new URL scheme, Google made our lives so much easier.

Introducing the multi-site plugin

We have already started writing a brand-new plugin called multi-site. Yes, it has a different name, because the direction that it’s taking is completely different in terms of decisions compared to the high-availability plugin, which required having a shared file system. Secondly, the HTTP synchronous communication with the other site was not feasible anymore. What happens if, for instance, a remote Site in India is not reachable for 50 seconds? I still want things events and data to be put into a persistent queue to be eventually sent through the remote site.

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.24.06
For the multi-site broker implementation, were have decided to start with Kafka, because there is already an implementation of the stream events it in Gerrit as a plugin. The multi-site plugin, however, won’t be limited to Kafka but could be extended to support other popular brokers such as NATS.

We will go to the location-aware DNS because we want the users to access the HAProxy that is closer to him. If I am living in Germany maybe it makes sense for me to use only the European servers, but definitely not the servers in California.

You will go by default to a “location-aware” site that is closer to you. However, depending on what you do, you could still be laster on redirected to another server across zones.

For example, if I want to fetch data, I can still fetch everything on my local site. But, if I want to push data, the operation can either be executed locally or forwarded to the remote site, if the target repository has been sharded remotely.

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.24.43

The advantage is the location-awareness and data-locality. The majority of data transfer will happen with my local site because, at the end of the day, the major complaints of people using Gerrit with remote masters is a sluggish GUI.

If you have Gerrit master/slave, for instance, a Gerrit master in San Francisco and your Gerrit slaves in India, you have the problem that everyone from India will still have to access a remote GUI from the server in San Francisco, and thus would experience a very slow GUI.

Even if only 10 percent of your traffic is a write operation, you would suffer from all the performance penalties of using a remote server in San Francisco. However, if I have an intelligent HAProxy, with also an intelligent logic in Gerrit that understands where the traffic needs to go to, I can always talk to my local server is in my zone. Then, depending on what I do, I can use my local server or a remote server. This happens behind the scenes and is completely transparent to the user.

Q&A

Screenshot 2019-03-02 at 01.25.33

Q I just wanted to ask if you’re ignoring SSH?

SSH is a problem in this architecture, right, because HAProxy supports SSH, but has a big problem.

Q: You don’t know what projects, you don’t have any idea of the operation, whether it’s read or write.

Exactly. HAProxy works at transport levels, so it means that it knows that flow of encrypted data going back and forth to the Gerrit server, but cannot see anything in clear and thus cannot make an educated decision based on it. Your data may end up being forwarded to the zone where your traffic is not optimized, and you will end up waiting a little bit more. But, bear in mind, that the majority of complaints about Gerrit master/slave is not really on the speed of the push/pull but rather on the sluggish Gerrit GUI.

Of course, we’ll find as a Community a solution to the SSH problem, I would be more than happy to address that in multi-site as well.

Q: Solution is to get a better LAN because we don’t have any complaints about the GUI across the continents.

Okay, yeah, get a super fast network across the globe, so everyone and everywhere in the world will be super fast accessing a single unique central point. However, not everyone can have a super-fast network. For instance in GerritHub, we don’t own the infrastructure so we cannot control the speed. Similarly, a lot of people are adopting a cloud infrastructure, where you don’t own and control the infrastructure anymore.

Q: Would you also have some Gerrit slaves in this setup. Would there be several masters and some of the slaves? Or everything will become just a master?

In multi-site architecture, everything can be a master. The distinction between master and slave does not exist anymore. Functionally speaking, some of them will be master for certain repositories and slave for other repositories. You can say that every single node is capable of managing any type of operations. But, based on this smart routing, any node can potentially manage everything, but effectively forwards the calls based on where is best to execute them.
If with this simple multi-site solution you can serve the 99% of the traffic locally, and for that one percent, we accept the compromise of going a bit slower, than it could still sound very good.

We implement this architecture last year with a client that is distributed worldwide and it just worked, because it is very simple and very effective. There isn’t any “magic product” involved but simply standard OpenSource components.

We are on a journey, because as Martin said last year in his talk, “Don’t try to do multi-master all at once.” Every single situation is different, every client is different, every installation is different, and all your projects are different. You will always need to compromise, find the trade-off, and tailor the solution to your needs.

Q: I think in most of the cases that I saw up there, you were deploying a Gerrit master in multiple locations? If you want to deploy multi-master in the same sites, like say I want two Gerrit servers in Palo Alto, does that change the architecture at all? Basically, I am referring to shared NFS.

This is actually the point made by Martin: if you have the problem on multi-site, it’s not a problem of Gerrit, it’s a problem of your network because your network is too slow. You should solve the network, you shouldn’t solve this problem in Gerrit.
Actually, the architecture is this one. Imagine you have a super fast network all across the globe, everyone is reaching the same Gerrit in the same way. You have a super fast direct connection with your shared NFS, so you can go and grow your master and scale horizontally.

The answer is, for instance, yes, if your company can do that. Absolutely, I wouldn’t recommend doing multi-site at all. But if you cannot do anything about speed, and you got people that work remotely and unfortunately, you cannot go and put a cable between the U.S. and India, under the sea just for your company, then maybe you want to address the problem in a multi-site fashion way.

One more thing that I wanted to point out, is that the multi-site plugin makes sense even in the same site. Why this picture is better than the previous one? I’m not talking about multi-site, I’m talking about multi-master on the same data center. Why this one is better?

You’ll read and write into both. Read, write, traffic to both. The difference between this one and previous is that there is no shared file system on this one. The previous, even within the same data center, if you use a shared file system, you still have a single point of failure. Because, even if you are willing to buy the most expensive shared file system with the most expensive network and system that exists in the world, they will still fail. Reliability cannot be simply resolved by throwing more money on it.
It’s not the money that makes my system reliable. Machines and disks will fail one day or another. If you don’t plan for failures, you’re going to fail anyway.

Q: Let’s say when you’re doing an upgrade on all of your Gerrit masters right? Do you have an automatic mechanism to upgrade? I’m coming from a perspective where we have our Gerrit on Kubernetes. So, sure, if I’m doing a rolling upgrade, it’s kind of like a piece of cake, HAProxy is taking care of by confd and all that stuff, right?
In your situation, how does an upgrade would look like, especially if you’re trying to upgrade all the masters across the globe? Do you pick and choose which site gets upgraded first and then let the replication plugins catch up after that?

First of all, the rolling upgrade with Kubernetes will work if you do minor upgrades. If you’re doing major Gerrit upgrades, it doesn’t. This is because that changes the data, right? With the minor upgrades, you do exactly the same here. Even if the others in the other zones have a different version, they are still interoperable, right, because they talk exactly to the same schema, exactly to the same API, exactly in the same way.

Q: I guess taking Kubernetes out of the picture, even, so with the current multi-master setup you have, if you’re not doing just a trivial upgrade, how do you approach that usually?

If you are doing a major version upgrade, that is going to orchestrate exactly like the GerritHub upgrade from 2.14 to 2.15. You need to use what I called a ping-pong technique. You basically need to do across data centers.

It’s not fully automated yet. I’m trying to automate it as much as possible and contribute back to the community.

Q: In the multi-master, when you’re doing the major upgrade, and even in the ping pong, so if the schemas changed, and you’re adding the events to replication plugin, are you going to temporarily suspend replication during the period of time? Because the other items on the earlier version don’t understand that schema yet. Can you explain that a little?

Okay, when you do the ping pong that was this morning presentation, what happens is the upgrade on the first node, interruption the traffic there, you do all the testing you want, you are behind with the original master but it catches up with replication and does all the testing.

With regards to the replication event, they are not understood by the client, such as the Jenkins Gerrit trigger plugin. That point was raised this morning as well. If you go to YouTube.com/GerritForgeTV, there is the recording of my talk of last year about a new plugin that is not subject to this fluctuation of Garret version.

Luca Milanesio – Gerrit Code Review Maintainer and Release Manager

Gerrit v2.14 / v2.15 talk at Palo Alto

This week we have published the recording of David Pursehouse (CollabNet) talk about Gerrit v2.14 and v2.15. Even though the releases are not new, there are many improvements were made recently, especially regarding the support for Elasticsearch as an engine to store the Gerrit secondary indexes.

Introduction

Hello, I am David Pursehouse, Gerrit Maintainer and release manager.

So, I’m going to talk about 2.14. Actually, this is the same presentation as I already gave last year. So, some of you may have seen it already. Although, I have made … how do I just … I have made some changes.

Basically, 2.14 isn’t new anymore. it’s already 18 months old, but even last year when I presented this, it was already six months old. And it has been in constant development since then. Even until this month we’ve been adding new stuff or making new releases.

And I’ll also touch a bit on 2.15 because yesterday evening we realized that there isn’t a 2.15 talk in the schedule today or tomorrow. So, I will briefly cover 2.15.

What’s new in v2.14

A number of new features in 2.14. I won’t read them all out because I’ve got separate slides for them, but there are some new features as well, which I’ll talk a bit more about later, which were not in 2.14 last year.

Some notes on important things about upgrading to 2.14, and actually the same things apply if you are upgrading to 2.15, 2.16. We require Java 8, so I assume most of you are already on Java 8 at least, so that shouldn’t be an issue, but these things are things that people run into when they’re doing the upgrades on the mailing list and issue tracker. So, these are the things that people have stumbled on that you should know about.

There’s no more HTTP digest authentication. This was basically because of moving to the accounts to NoteDb and not being able to store them in NoteDb. If you upgrade, it will get migrated. I think there were some issues with this initially, but they’ve been fixed in the bug fix releases. And the main thing for users here is that you can’t see your password in the UI anymore. It doesn’t display it. If you want a new password, you have to reset it, and then it disappears.

Also, there’s a new secondary index for groups, and you need to reindex that before you start the server. Otherwise your groups don’t work, and basically, Gerrit doesn’t work. And there are more details about this in the release notes.

Speaking of which, probably you have already seen this already because we’ve been sending out emails with the links, but we’ve moved the release notes to the new homepage, which is on www.gerritcodereview.com. When I wrote this last year, it was the case that the change would go live immediately after we submit them, but we’ve changed the hosting, and that isn’t the case anymore. Luca was going to fix that, but I don’t think he has. No. That will get fixed soon I hope.

New features in v2.14.

We move onto the actual new features. These are not in any particular order. It’s just a brain dump of the new stuff. Changes can now be assigned to people, and you can search for them with the new operators and make it highlighted. And that’s basically it. There’s no workflow around this. Gerrit doesn’t enforce any workflow for assigned changes. You can use it as you like, although I think there’s been some discussion about changing that to make it a more defined workflow so that people are more aware of what assignable changes are. There’s confusion among people about what does it mean when a change gets assigned to somebody. And right now it means nothing. There’s no enforcement of that in Gerrit.

Changes can now be deleted if they’re open or abandoned. This is kind of similar to previously with draft changes. You could delete a draft change, but now you can delete any change that’s basically not merged. And that can be done by the administrator or the owner of the change, assuming they’ve been given the capability. And this basically deletes the change completely. It deletes the ref. It deletes the metadata. And you can’t delete merged changes for obvious reasons.

The next one is reviewer suggestions. If you click on the box to add a new review, it will suggest based on previous users who have already reviewed your changes. And it can also be filtered. Also, there’s an extension point. Plugins can inject suggestions, although I’m not sure if any plugins actually implement that, but it’s there.

New email templates. Now we’re using a different framework for templating. It supports HTML, and the previous templating engine is going to be removed, actually is removed in 2.16. Still present in 2.14, 2.15, but deprecated.

Inbound email. This is a feature that was implemented by Patrick at Google. If you get a notification of a review from Gerrit, you can reply to that, and it will add the comments on the change. And if you click this link, you get more details about that.

Tagged comments. This is a way that enables you to filter the comments in the UI according to whether they’re by humans or robots, in this case meaning CI. So, for example, on the example here, you can see that all the CI comments are not shown on the right side. I think this only works in the new UI. I’m not … Is that right? I don’t know. Maybe it works in both UIs. I’m not sure.

So, in the new UI in 2.14 there’s been a lot of improvements compared to previously, and it’s basically usable for most of the common things that you want to do like reviewing changes, but there’s still a lot missing. A lot of the admin pages are missing. And you can switch between the two. So, if anything’s missing in PolyGerrit, you go to GWT and do it there. And if you look at this talk that’s linked here, it will give you an overview of the development of PolyGerrit, the idea behind it and so on.

The merge list is a dynamically generated list of commits that are going to be included by a merge commit, and it appears in the UI as a file that you can review, which is really useful if the commit author didn’t use a log option on the merge, so you can see what really is coming in by that merge and you can maybe catch if someone’s done it against the wrong parent or something. This isn’t actually a real file. It doesn’t get included in your commit. It’s just generated on the fly by the server.

Support for Elasticsearch as a secondary index

This is new since the last time I did this talk. And I want to thank Marco and David, who are the guys that really made this work. A lot of work went in by these guys to get Elasticsearch working. This is included since 2.14.8 with minimal support for Version 2 of Elasticsearch. And then there are a few maintenance releases which add support for five and six. If you look at this link here, you’ll see the more detailed list of compatibility between Gerrit and Elasticsearch. There actually was this week a new version of Elasticsearch, which will not be supported in 2.14 as far as planned. I’ve got a change up for review that will support that in 2.15.8, whatever the next one is. And I know Elasticsearch 7 is coming soon, but we haven’t started working on that yet. If we do, it’ll be in 2.15.whatever.

This is another new one since the last presentation. This object size limit is an option in Gerrit that’s been there for a long time. It allows you to prevent people uploading big files, but the problem with that was it was kind of weird to configure it. You couldn’t configure it on a project and have it inherited to the children projects. It was either global or per project. So, now you can configure this and have it inherited, but we made it so it’s disabled by default, so it doesn’t mess up anyone’s existing configurations.

And there was one minor update of LFS in 2.14.1. Actually, we added LFS in 2.13, but then we added support for the file locking. And the support for the Amazon S3 and File-system isn’t new, but previously there were separate plugins, and now we’ve rolled them together into the one single LFS plugin.

Overview of new features in v2.15

And now finally just a brief overview of what’s in 2.15. I’ve taken this from Dave’s talk from last year, but he had a lot of details about NoteDb, which I’m not really qualified to talk about, so I’ll kind of gloss over it a bit. There is a lot more PolyGerrit UI functionality, but it’s still not equal with GWT. You need to wait for 2.16 to get that. The support for NoteDb allows having some things that were not available before. The separation of reviewer and CC in the changes with a history of adding reviewers. Hashtags, actually, were introduced a long time ago, I think in 2.13, but required NoteDb, so it couldn’t really be used. The robot comments, which is basically CI can inject comments into the changes and suggest changes. You can also ignore a change, which means it will just not appear in your dashboard. You can mark it as reviewed, so that it will not be highlighted. There is also a really improved experience in diff between rebased patch sets, and again, in Dave’s presentation from last year, there is a lot more detail about that. So, if you want to know more, you can look at that.

We have a new change workflow. The draft changes are removed and replaced by private and work in progress, and David will talk about that this morning. And there’s a lot of other stuff that I kind of missed, but if you want to see that, you can look at Dave’s talk from last year, which is linked here.

Q&A

Q: We recently migrated to 2.14, and we often see the index and losing the indexing being really slow. How do we diagnose those issues, the indexing issues? I don’t see very good documentation on this.

A: If you have specific problems or issues and you have data to support that, you can submit a bug report or you can submit any questions to the mailing list. I don’t really know if there’s any way you can tweak that to make it perform better, but if you have specific questions, we can take them on the mailing list or in the issue tracker.

Q: Gerrit indexing works very badly when we have close to 2000 open changes. Is there a specific configuration to improve the performance? We are using v2.14.10.

A: I don’t know if there are any improvements from 10 up to the latest patch release. One thing about this 2.14 is we have made a much larger number of maintenance releases than previous releases, mainly because of the Elasticsearch support, but also there have been some pretty serious things fixed in these releases, so you probably should check the release notes and see if anything related to your issue is mentioned after 2.14.10.

Q: You mentioned Java 8. I was wondering if any later Java would also work, or does it specifically have to be Java 8? And generally, what’s the thinking about newer versions of Java support?

A: Yeah. There is work ongoing to support later versions of Java, and David Ostrovsky will tell you about that in his presentation.

David Pursehouse (CollabNet) – Gerrit Maintainer and Release Manager.

Gerrit User Summit 2018

The Gerrit User Summit 2018 has ended. It has been a truly memorable event and with strong emotions, gratitude and celebration of the success of the Gerrit OpenSource project.

During the hackathon, some major events happened:

  • The release of Gerrit v2.16
  • Support for Kubernetes
  • New plugins contributed by Qualcomm
  • The announcement of a new maintainer, Marco Miller from Ericsson, congrats!

Hackathon and Gerrit v2.16

The hackathon took place at SAP (2 days) and Cloudera (1 day) in Palo Alto with the main focus of completing the migration to PolyGerrit and cut the v2.16 release. Three major milestones of the Gerrit project:

  1. PolyGerrit as default UI for Gerrit Code Review.
  2. Migration of the groups to NoteDb
  3. Support of the Git protocol v2

With regards to the achievement #1, during the hackathon, the commit for removing all the GWT related code from Gerrit master has been finally merged.

PolyGerrit as default Gerrit Code Review UI

The PolyGerrit Team has reached the summit of the long and troubled journey of getting rid of the outdated and Gerrit GWT UI. Kasper and Logan (Google) burned every single bit of their development energy to fix, implement and fill all the remaining gaps in the user journeys.

On Gerrit v2.16, PolyGerrit UI is the default and standard way of interacting with Gerrit Code Review. GWT is still there for allowing people to smoothly adapt to the new interface. However, the next forthcoming version of Gerrit v3.0 will not contain anymore any reference to the old UI. People will still have a few more months to adapt and, from the feedback received on GerritHub.io, they seem to not miss the GWT interface at all.

Well done to the entire PolyGerrit Team, starting from Andrew who kicked off the project back in 2015 to Wyatt, Becky, Victor, Kasper and Logan who brought it up to the usability and portability to multiple devices as it is today. Thanks to their amazing effort, we can all interact with Gerrit Code Review wherever and whenever we want, without losing speed and effectiveness.

Migration of Gerrit groups to NoteDb

One more step towards the complete elimination of ReviewDb has been achieved in Gerrit v2.16: there isn’t anymore any mutable data in the leftover of the (in)famous Gerrit DB. The new version includes a new git repository (All-Groups) which contains all the information related to the groups create through the Gerrit UI.

What’s left in ReviewDb? Not much: only the schema version. When you install Gerrit it is populated with a single row and a single column with the value ‘170’ and will never change. There is no need to share it across master or slaves: just set database.type = h2 and forget about it.

Git protocol v2

It is a major achievement of Gerrit v2.16 as the Git wire protocol v2 solves the performance problems of large repositories: the refs filtering during the advertisement phase.

In a nutshell, if you were fetching a single from a repository with 500k refs, the server would have sent a huge payload of all refs with the associated SHA1s even if at the end of the day you wanted only to fetch a single one. The delay could have been of several seconds if not minutes, which is quite relevant if you are fetching all the times, like in a CI/CD pipeline.

Git protocol v2 reduced the refs advertisement phase by over 70%, which makes Gerrit v2.16 so appealing that you may want to place in the top 5 tasks of your backlog.

Farewell to GWT UI code

Even though Gerrit v2.16 keeps the ability to display the old-fashioned GWT Gerrit UI, the code has been definitely removed on the Gerrit master branch, which will the base for Gerrit v3.0 that will be released in Spring 2019.

This is a memorable moment because represents the final act of making PolyGerrit UI the unified user-experience of Gerrit moving forward.

Data and Insights of the Hackathon

This year the event has been truly focused as well on the analytics side of the Code Review and the entire CI/CD pipeline: was it possibly the location, Cloudera, the world leader in OpenSource BigData and Analytics, giving the right vibrations? Possibly, yes.

Numbers

Over 20 people have attended the Hackathon on-site and, for the first time, remotely via video-conference, from companies and countries all around the world:

  1. Google (USA and Germany)
  2. CollabNet (Japan and Germany)
  3. GerritForge (UK, Ireland, Italy, and Germany)
  4. SAP (Germany)
  5. Qualcomm (USA)
  6. Ericsson (Canada)
  7. Wikimedia Foundation (UK)

Over 300+ changes have been uploaded and 244 of them have been already merged.

They have been working on 44 projects, showing how diverse is today the universe of Gerrit Code Review and its associated plugins and integrations.

Gerrit DevOps Analytics

GerritForge has been hacking on improving the platform that powers the Gerrit Code Review Analytics Platform which has been serving the community for many years.

For the first time, thanks to the introduction of branch-level analytics, the community had data automatically crunched in near-real time of what was happening on the master branch and on the on-going stable 2.16 release.

As a matter of fact, the numbers mentioned before are directly coming from Gerrit DevOps Analytics. Thanks again GerritForge for innovating and improving the Gerrit Code Review platform.

Gerrit Analytics Wizard

For the first time, two new contributors from GerritForge, Tony and Ponch, finalized and demoed a new plugin called ‘analytics-wizard’ that allows anyone with a Gerrit server to set up a mini-version of the Gerrit DevOps Analytics, using Docker, ElasticSearch, and Kibana.

Two new plugins: batch and tasks

Qualcomm has released two new plugins based on their experience of running complex pipelines on a multi-master Gerrit setup. The majority of the code was developed in-house before the hackathon. However, the final release and announced happened this week and I am sure it will allow many other companies to benefit from their experience of validating complex multi-repo changes on a large scale CI system.

Batch

This plugin provides a mechanism for building and previewing sets of proposed updates to multiple projects/refs that should be applied in a batch. These updates are built with Gerrit changes.

Task

The plugin provides a mechanism to manage tasks which need to be performed on changes along with a way to expose and query this information. Tasks are organized hierarchically, and task definitions use Gerrit queries to define which changes each task applies to, and how to define the status criteria for each task. An important use case of the task plugin is to have a common place for CI systems to define which changes they will operate on, and when they will do so.

Gerrit on Kubernetes from SAP and GerritForge

Luke (GerritForge), Matthias (SAP) and Thomas (SAP remotely from Germany) worked on a PoC for supporting Kubernetes deployments.

Last year SAP started using containerized slaves and decided to go cloud native and base our future Gerrit deployments on Kubernetes and leverage project Gardener to support multiple cloud providers. Matthias worked with Thomas to prepare a PoC and a demo the current work in progress and discuss plans moving forward.

The code has been published to the new k8s-gerrit repository and new commits will be subject to the standard Gerrit Code Review process.

Luke prepared an example of Gerrit v2.15 deployment in Kubernetes (single master at the moment) with shared storage and showed how to upgrade easily by leveraging Helm Charts deployments through Tiler.

Even though the two projects started in parallel, they agreed to cooperate and work together with the community to have a unified Kubernetes deployment code-base for installing and upgrading multi-master Gerrit setups. This is definitely an area where we will see very interesting developments very soon.

What about the Summit?

The talks of the summit have been very interesting this year and have covered mostly three main topics: Gerrit roadmap and scalability, sharing of real-life migrations to Gerrit v2.14 and v2.15 and, as previously mentioned, Data Analytics & Insights including research work on using machine-learning for supporting the Code Review process.

All the talks are getting published as we speak on each talk of the Gerrit User Summit Schedule.

All the talks have been recorded and will be published within the next few weeks on the GerritForge TV YouTube channel.

More blog posts will follow with more background on each talk, stay tuned and watch this space to know more about what has been presented and announced at the Summit.

Proposals for the next Gerrit User Summit 2019

The overall feedback on the summit has been very positive, including the Birthday Party organized and sponsored by GerritForge for the 10th anniversary of the Gerrit Code Review project.

During the final closing keynote, many interesting proposals have been made:

  • Gerrit users’ wish-list session.
    Any Gerrit user can feed the backlog of new feature proposing what they will like to see implemented
  • Gerrit plugin hackathon.
    Learn how to implement Gerrit plugin and trying to put together in one or two days something useful using any of the programming languages they wish, including Java, Groovy, Scala or anything else.

More details will come as soon as the closing keynote session recording will be published.

Remembering Shawn Pearce and his legacy

Dave Borowitz, the leader of the Gerrit Code Review project, made a thoughtful and touching speech about Shawn Pearce, the father of the Gerrit 2, who started the project exactly 10 years ago. The cake, the hackathon, the summit, and the v2.16 release have been fully dedicated to his memory as appreciation for his humanity and passion for OpenSource.

Thanks, Shawn. We will continue on your legacy and improve the Gerrit Code Review platform as you would have wanted us to do.

 

 

 

Gerrit User Summit: only two weeks away

GerritUserSummitPaloAlto.png

It is exciting times for the Gerrit Code Review project, which is approaching its 10th anniversary. The very first commit is dated 14th of November 2008, exactly ten years back from the official kick-off the 15th of November 2018 of the Gerrit User Summit 2018 in Palo Alto

commit 23571ab1fa7fedc262d6c21510614353e9d8a4dc
Author: Shawn O. Pearce <sop@google.com>
Date: Fri Nov 14 16:56:58 2008 -0800

Initial project setup of Gerrit 2

Gerrit 2 is a ground-up rewrite of Gerrit, using GWT (Google Web
Toolkit) for the client side user interface and a Java servlet
based backend.

Signed-off-by: Shawn O. Pearce <sop@google.com>

An exciting schedule with talks about new features

The program is now complete and includes a lot of interesting talks about what’s new and noteworthy in Gerrit:

There are as well very interesting use-cases of using Gerrit in real-life scenarios:

The summit is kindly hosted by Cloudera, the world’s leader of the BigData OpenSource Platform. It is not a coincidence that there are talks about Gerrit and the DevOps Analytics:

Recordings of the Gerrit User Summit 2017 in London

The best way to get ready to the Summit this year is to watch what happened during the past 12 months, compared to what was announced at the Gerrit User Summit held at Skills Matter in Central London back in 2017, leveraging all the free content available on the GerritForge TV YouTube Channel. There is a lot to learn about Gerrit and its related technologies.

All the talks are now live, including the very interesting board discussion between the European members of the Gerrit Code Review community and the Maintainers of the project.

Don’t miss the dates, 15-16 November

2018 is an exceptional year for the Gerrit Community, and this Summit will most likely be the largest ever in the history of the Git Together and Gerrit User Summits of the past ten years.

Have a safe trip and see you soon see you at Cloudera HQ in Palo Alto Palo Alto.

Luca Milanesio – GerritForge
Gerrit Code Review Maintainer

 

 

 

 

Gerrit User Summit 2018

Gerrit1-high-res.pngWe are pleased to announce that GerritForge, in cooperation with Cloudera and the Gerrit Code Review Community, will be organizing again this year the Gerrit User Summit and Hackathon.

Gerrit User Summit is the event that brings together Gerrit admins, developers, practitioners, the whole community and ecosystem, in one place, providing attendees with the opportunity to learn, explore, network face-to-face and help shape the future of Gerrit development and solutions.

The event will be kindly hosted by Cloudera in their HQ in Palo Alto, in the heart of the Silicon Valley next to the prestigious Stanford University.

Dates

Schedule

Shortly we will be publishing the full agenda and logistics for the event, look forward to that. There are still some available slots for proposing a talk, see the instructions on how to submit your topic.

On behalf of GerritForge and the Gerrit Code Review Community,
Luca Milanesio – GerritForge Ltd